FAQ

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Questions

 

1. Can I contribute to development of the Tracks website?

2. Can I download the track data?

3. How do I create and upload the Google Maps data for a track?

4. How do I delete an obsolete trail

5. How do I display track data on my GPS-enabled device?

6. How do I suggest a feature or report a problem?

7. Is there somewhere I can discuss the Tracks website?

8. The maps don't work properly on my computer – what can I do?

9. What does the track 'Grade' mean?

10. Can anyone edit the tracks?

11. How can I apply formatting and links when editing?

Answers

 

Can I contribute to development of the Tracks website?

The source code for the Tracks website has been released as a github project. You can contribute to the development of Tracks by joining the github project and working on the Feature Requests and Problem Reports to make Tracks an even better place.


Can I download the track data?

There are two ways to download the track data:

Individual track: The data for each track is available for download by clicking the "kml" link under the track's map (labelled "Download GPS path: kml").

All tracks: The data for all tracks, including descriptions, is available in a single aggregate file.

A kml file can be opened in a variety of applications, including Google Earth.


How do I create and upload the Google Maps data for a track?

The Google Maps use the kml file format. The easiest way to create a kml file is to use Google Earth.

There are two options for creating the kml track data:

GPS log. If you have a GPS log of the track, then open it in Google Earth. GPS is an inherently imprecise technology, so the GPS log may need editing to remove spurious data points or to adjust the recorded points to better match the aerial photo. Right-click on the track and select "Properties" to edit the track.

No GPS log. Don't worry if you don't have a GPS log of the track – you can still create the map data by drawing the track manually in Google Earth. Use the "Add Path" tool to draw the track.

Once you've got the track looking good, give it a name (right-click and select "Properties"). The name will be displayed on the Google Map when the user points at the track.

Then save the track to a kml file as follows:

Right-click on the track (either in the map view or in the "Places" bar).

Select "Save Place As…" and enter a file name.

Select the kml file type (rather than the default kmz file type, which is a compressed kml file).

Click the "Save" button to save the kml file somewhere convenient.

To upload the kml file to Tracks, Sign In and click the "Upload GPS path file" link under the track's map.


How do I delete an obsolete trail

There isn't currently a feature for deleting an obsolete track. However, see Feature Request 0092 which is a request for this feature.

In the meantime, the track's Access field could be changed to "Closed" – along with a note indicating why.


How do I display track data on my GPS-enabled device?

It may be useful to download a track's kml file from this website and then upload it to display on your GPS-enabled device. For example: to help you find, or stay on, a track you're unfamiliar with. The procedure for doing this depends on your particular device, but in general:

Some mobile devices, such as iPhone (using an app) and Blackberry, can display a kml file on a Google Map.

Other devices may require the file to be converted to a different format before it can be uploaded and displayed on the device. For example, Garmin GPS units use the gpx file format. The freeware application GPSBabel can help with converting between file formats.


How do I suggest a feature or report a problem?

To suggest a new or modified feature, go to Suggest a feature.

To report a problem with the website, go to Report a problem.

You can vote for the features and problems that you'd like to receive higher priority. There's also a comment facility associated with each feature and problem, so you can contribute your views or provide additional information. You need to be signed-in to suggest a feature, report a problem, or comment on an existing feature or problem.

Open feature requests and problem reports can be found in the Features and problems list.


Is there somewhere I can discuss the Tracks website?

Well yes, there is. Have a look at All things tracks.org.nz, where you can ask questions, discuss tracks, or chat about anything else relevant to the Tracks website.


The maps don't work properly on my computer – what can I do?

If the map doesn't display, or the problem is with one of the Google Maps types (ie. the "Map", "Satellite", and "Terrain" buttons on the map), then have a look at the Google Maps troubleshooting guide.

If the problem is with the Google Earth map type (ie. the "Earth 3D" button on the map), then have a look at the Google Earth API FAQ. Note that the first time you select the "Earth" map type, the Google Earth browser plugin will be downloaded and installed – just follow the prompts to complete the installation.


What does the track 'Grade' mean?

The grade indicates how difficult a track is, using the track grading system developed by the Department of Conservation and Mountain Bike New Zealand. The same grading system is used for walking and mountain biking, though many tracks will be somewhat easier to walk than to ride.

The track grades are defined as: Grades

Note that most tracks will be more difficult when wet.


Can anyone edit the tracks?

Yes anyone can edit tracks and areas. You need to be signed-in to make changes. If you want to create new tracks (or areas) please send an email to info@tracks.org.nz


How can I apply formatting and links when editing?

The following simple formatting options are available in various free-text editing boxes:

New line: [[br]] ⇒ insert a newline/end of line

New paragraph: [[para]] ⇒ start a new paragraph (ie. putting a blank line in a text box doesn't create a new paragraph when displayed – the [[para]] tag needs to be used).

Heading level 1: [[h1:heading]] ⇒ create a heading - level 1

Heading level 2: [[h2:heading]] ⇒ create a heading - level 2

Bold text: [[bold:text]] ⇒ make 'text' bold

Italic text: [[italic:text]] ⇒ make 'text' italic

Bullet point: [[bullet:text]] ⇒ insert a bullet point containing 'text'

Link to Feature request: [[feature:n]] ⇒ link to feature or problem id 'n', as listed on the Features page.

Embed an image: [[image:ref:alt:width:height]] ⇒ display an image, which must already be available on the web, where: 'ref' is a link to the image; 'alt' is the alternate text to display if the image is not available; 'width' is the image width in pixels (up to 492 pixels wide); 'height' is the image height in pixels. Provide all colons even if not supplying the 'alt', 'width' or 'height'. It might be necessary to precede the image with [[para]] or [[br]]. At present 'ref' must include the full web address including the http:// part.
For example: [[image:http://i443.photobucket.com/albums/qq159/ian314159_pics/Danger.png:Rifle range warning sign on Goat Rock:200:206]].

Hyperlink: [[link:ref name]] ⇒ create a hyperlink, where: 'ref' is the link; 'name' is the displayed link name. A space divides 'ref' and 'name'. Give the fully qualified address (ie. including the http:// part) for external links. To correctly identify an internal tracks.org.nz link give the full tracks.org.nz in front of the link.
For example: [[link:http://www.google.com Google]] becomes Google.

Cross-reference to a track: [[track:region:name]] ⇒ internal link to track 'name'. Track names must be unique within a region, though different regions may have tracks with the same name – hence the need to include the 'region' within the cross-reference. Note special use for when track name is all numbers: prepend the track name with a '#' (this is an edge case, but it has happened). For example: [[track:Wellington:Aratihi]] becomes Aratihi.
An alternative format is to use the track's number (shown in the brower's address bar been viewing a track). For example: [[track:1271]] becomes Bull-a-Varde.

Cross-reference to an area: [[area:name]] ⇒ internal link to area 'name'.
For example: [[area:Makara Peak]] becomes Makara Peak.

Cross-reference to a region: [[region:name]] ⇒ internal link to region 'name'.
For example: [[region:Wellington]] becomes Wellington.

Embed YouTube video: [[media:youtube:ref]] ⇒ embed YouTube video.
Where: 'ref' is the 'v=...' part of the link.
For example: use the 6kxDxLAjkO8 part of the following YouTube URL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kxDxLAjkO8

Embed Vorb video: [[media:vorb:ref]] ⇒ embed Vorb video.
Where: 'ref' is the 'id=...' part of the Vorb URL. The easiest way to find this URL is to right-click the video link, copy location, and paste it somewhere temporary.
For example: use the 65226 part of the following Vorb URL
http://www.vorb.org.nz/rez_viewattach.php?id=65226&mode=&TB_iframe=false.

Embed Vimeo video: [[media:vimeo:ref]] ⇒ embed Vimeo video.
Where: 'ref' is the last part of the Vimeo URL.
For example: use the 6691202 part of the following Vimeo URL
http://www.vimeo.com/6691202

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